Education in international development settings, including in conflict and post-conflict contexts: teachers, quality and learning, and inequalities related to poverty, gender and disability.

Primary school students in Alamana, Tanzania

The low level of numeracy skills of millions of poor and marginalised students, particularly in developing nations, is of international concern. This project focuses on improving these through developing teachers' and teacher trainers' pedagogical and assessment skills in extremely deprived urban areas in South Africa and Tanzania. Eighteen schools and three training colleges will be involved.

Vukani Primary School, Cape Town, South Africa.

The aim of the study is to understand resilience and exceptionalism in high-functioning township and rural primary schools in South Africa. Previous research has shown that a large part of the explanation behind these schools' success is the leadership and management practices of teachers and particularly principals.

News: How to package and present research to the media: Highlights from Impact Initiative workshop at the 2017 UKFIET Education and Development conference

20/09/2017
Highlights from the Impact Initiative led workshop at the 2017 UKFIET conference which gave education researchers expert insight into working with journalists and the media.

Blog: ‘Super Synthesising’ the evidence of what works best in education for development

Jul 2017
David Coleman, Senior Education Advisor at the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, discusses 'Super Synthesis' - a new user-friendly tool which aims to enable decision makers – national governments, development partners and involved stakeholders – to easily assess possible interventions by the level of impact on participation and student learning outcomes, and the likely associated costs.

Informal m-health: How are young people using mobile phones to bridge healthcare gaps in Sub-Saharan Africa?

Drawing on qualitative and quantitative data collected in 2012–2014 from over 4500 young people (aged 8–25 y) in Ghana, Malawi and South Africa, this paper documents practices of using mobile phones to seek healthcare and the new therapeutic opportunities they create, alongside the constraints, contingencies and risks.

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