Research for policy and practice

ESRC-DFID research for policy and practice: gender and education

Photo: Kieran Dodds/Tearfund/Panos Pictures

This collection of ESRC-DFID-funded research provides valuable evidence on strategies to ensure commitments to eliminate gender disparities in education are met. Beyond ensuring that every child – both girls and boys – is in school and learning, it highlights new approaches to how gender equality in and through education can be measured, which is crucial to achieving more than just gender parity in education. It also demonstrates the need for multi-stakeholder collaboration to challenge existing norms and traditions; and, highlights the benefits of social-emotional learning activities which can be particularly effective for girls in conflict-affected contexts.

 

Focus projects: 

School Children in Zomba, Malawi.

The Framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the UN in 2015 set ambitious targets for achieving an expansion of education provision worldwide and enhancing gender equality. The Policy Document Education 2030 sets out the detail on this. Some new indicators to monitor, evaluate and build accountability for this framework have been developed and others are under discussion by a number of technical committees. This project aims to contribute to this work.

School children in Honduras
This project will examine a number of questions regarding factors to support effective teaching in poor, rural communities in Honduras. The research will also provide a unique opportunity to develop improved measures of educational quality and adolescent girls' empowerment.
Children walking to school in Niger’s Diffa region

Children in conflict-affected countries (CACs) experience profound constraints on their academic learning and socioemotional well-being. Children exposed to violence and poverty come to "school" (formal or non-formal education settings) with poor executive function skills (e.g. working memory, inhibition, attention), emotional/behavioral regulation skills and social-information-processing skills.