Principal Investigator: Naila Kabeer. Lead Organistion: London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)

Co-investigators: James Heintz (University of Massachusetts Amherst) and Simeen Mahmud (BRAC University)

credit: Martin Prowse
This research evaluated the addition of gender-specific elements within existing contract farming operations in Malawi and Tanzania. It assessed whether gender-specific clauses increase the benefits smallholders and firms accrue from the relationship.
Pupils attending deaf school in Sri Lanka
The research delivers an in-depth understanding of the problems that teachers face supporting students from diverse backgrounds, the teaching practices they adopt, and the kinds of support they need to help all children fulfill their learning potential.
flickr.com/photos/mastababa
The project aimed to review the process for teachers and school managers to identify high ability children attending schools in slums of Dar es Salaam, in Tanzania and create an accurate/cost-efficient programme to enrich and accelerate learning.

Chronic poverty is a condition that requires an understanding of the processes that make, and keep, people poor. The economic analysis of chronic poverty must take into account the interaction between external circumstances (initial wealth social status, health) and intrinsic psychological factors (aspirations, self-confidence, beliefs).

Poor menstrual knowledge and access to sanitary products have been proposed as barriers to menstrual health and school attendance. Previously there has been no research to support this assertion. This study, a randomised control trial that assessed the impact of providing reusable sanitary pads and puberty education on girls' school attendance and psychosocial wellbeing outcomes, was the first to investigate this issue.

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