A major challenge for achieving poverty reduction is that the capacity of states to deliver development is in short supply, particularly in Africa. However, 'pockets of effectiveness' (PoEs) offer important clues concerning how developmental forms of state capacity might emerge and be sustained in difficult contexts.
This research examines common systemic barriers disabled people encounter when accessing services, and the lack of information and inclusion in national level poverty reduction strategies.

Urban areas in sub-Saharan Africa are growing rapidly. While there has been considerable attention paid to the challenges of African mega-cities, the experiences of smaller urban areas have been relatively neglected. Secondary cities, with populations of less than half a million, are absorbing two-thirds of all urban population growth in Africa.

credit: flickr.com/photos/xav
The project uses Collaborative Participatory Action Research methods and seeks to contribute new analytical evidence to debate and policy about the role and effectiveness of regional formations in health-poverty reduction programmes in the Global South.
This project aims to maximise the impact of research that has investigated the socio-economic costs of unsafe and safe abortion for women, their households and the Zambian health system.
Juliet, a mentor at a girls' safe space in Zambia.  flickr.com/photos/dfid/
Unsafe abortion is a significant, preventable, cause of maternal mortality and morbidity and is both a cause and a consequence of poverty. Unsafe abortion is the most easily prevented cause of maternal death. Post-abortion care (PAC) is a strategy to address the problem of the outcomes of unsafe abortion. This research aims to establish how investment in safe abortion services impacts on the socio-economic conditions of women and their households, and the implications for policy-making and service provision in Zambia.
source: www.flickr.com/photos/theworldfishcenter

This research aims to identify pathways of wellbeing and poverty within rural communities in Zambia and India.

Despite infrastructure being the dominant expenditure category of most governments in the developing world (as well of multilateral and bilateral development organisations), we have a very limited understanding of whether and how infrastructure investments affect poverty and development. Two projects focused on India and East Africa will attempt to fill this key gap in our knowledge.

More UK aid supplies land in earthquake-hit Nepal
The research spans low-income, aid-dependent states that are landlocked (Malawi, Zambia), Island economies (Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea), and also transition economies (China, India) and addresses the salary gap that exists between aid workers working for different agencies.
Examining whether and how Africans, particularly the poorest and least politically enfranchised, use new communication technologies to voice their opinion and to engage in a public debate on interactive broadcast media.

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