A teacher in Uganda
The Literacy Laboratory Project (LLP) in Uganda aims to scale up and evaluate the Mango Tree literacy program, promoting reading and writing, especially in local languages, as a meaningful part of daily life in households and communities.

Despite infrastructure being the dominant expenditure category of most governments in the developing world (as well of multilateral and bilateral development organisations), we have a very limited understanding of whether and how infrastructure investments affect poverty and development. Two projects focused on India and East Africa will attempt to fill this key gap in our knowledge.

Poor menstrual knowledge and access to sanitary products have been proposed as barriers to menstrual health and school attendance. Previously there has been no research to support this assertion. This study, a randomised control trial that assessed the impact of providing reusable sanitary pads and puberty education on girls' school attendance and psychosocial wellbeing outcomes, was the first to investigate this issue.

Concerned with exploring the space for empowerment of those who suffer illbeing through their gender identity, this study with married couples in a rural area of Eastern Uganda uses multiple methods including survey data, ethnography and experimental economics.

Investments to promote desired environment-development outcomes are some of the hardest to assess, because the causes of environmental resource scarcity are complex, and affect multiple aspects of human wellbeing, not just income. Credible evaluations of the impacts of these programmes on human wellbeing are few, offering little evidence to inform decision-makers about what works, for whom, and why. This project has three parts:

Picture: mcandrea licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0
The research examines Amartya Sen's contention that shame is an attribute of poverty in all societies. Shame is believed to reduce a person's agency, the capacity to act constructively, and to increase social exclusion which, in turn, curtail economic development.

Forests are crucial to the livelihoods of hundreds of millions of poor people worldwide, but just how important, and for what functions? Can they help lift people out of poverty, or are they mainly useful as gap-fillers and safety nets in response to shocks? Are certain types of forest-tenure and management regimes more favourable than others? And under what conditions can increased integration into forest-product markets help?

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