Children walking to school in Niger’s Diffa region

Children in conflict-affected countries (CACs) experience profound constraints on their academic learning and socioemotional well-being. Children exposed to violence and poverty come to "school" (formal or non-formal education settings) with poor executive function skills (e.g. working memory, inhibition, attention), emotional/behavioral regulation skills and social-information-processing skills.

Principal Investigator: Mark Pelling. Lead Organisation: Kings College London.
 
Co-Investigator: Bruce D Malamud (Kings College London); Blessing Meru (frican Population and Health Research Center, APHRC); Adriana Elizabeth Allen;  (University College Lonodon); Cassidy Anne Johnson (University College London): Susan Marion Parnell (University of Bristol); Mtafu A.Z.
Children in Agadez, Niger.
Despite improvements in school enrolment over the past 20 years, 757 million adults worldwide are still unable to read and write in any language (UNESCO 2015). In Niger, the subject of this study, less than 30% of the population is considered to be literate (IMF 2013).
 
While a substantial body of research has focused on increasing school participation, there is still considerable debate about how to improve learning in a cost-effective way.
Building upon a successful mobile phone-based education pilot program in Niger (Aker et al 2012), this research will assess the impact of a mobile phone-based adult education program in Niger in an expanded population.
How does the relationship between populations living in areas of conflict, and armed non-state actors, result in forms of local governance and affect livelihoods? Based on work in Colombia, India, Lebanon, Niger and South Africa.
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