Issues specific to urban and rural contexts, including migration, environment, economics, food systems, and property rights.


News: 'Power of Partnership: Research to Alleviate Poverty' take a look at this snapshot of the event so far

03/12/2018

The ‘Power of Partnership: Research to Alleviate Poverty’ conference recently took place in Delhi, India from 3-5 December.

The event focused on the ESRC-DFID Joint Fund for Poverty Alleviation Research as it approaches its final phase. 

Urban Africa: Risk and Capacity (Urban ARC) is a three year programme of research and capacity building that aims to reduce disaster risk in urban sub-Saharan Africa by breaking cycles of risk accumulation. The programme aims to do this by building a community of practice including sub-Saharan, African and international researchers and practitioners that can provide a structured assessment of risk accumulation and reduction dynamics.

Aftermath of the fire at Sat'tola slum at Mohakhali, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Urbanisation is the defining feature of global population distribution. Until at least 2050, city growth will be concentrated in developing countries and most of that growth will come from migration from rural areas. Many poor, rural migrants will end up in the poorest neighbourhoods of these cities.

Bilay Wardere, from Kulaley Village, does not know her age – she says she is close to 100.
This research seeks to generate robust, urgently needed evidence to address the critical knowledge gaps in order to inform policy debates and thinking on the further development of the Older Persons Cash Transfer Programme in Kenya.

Our research addresses directly the following overarching question: What factors shape pathways into and out of poverty and people's experience of these, and how can policy create sustained routes out of extreme poverty in ways that can be replicated and scaled up? 

The study compares the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of alternative poverty eradication projects and assesses their scalability and sustainability. In particular, it answers the following questions:

Global poverty looks radically different in the 21st century as climate-related events, political-religious conflicts and economic growth-inequality nexuses add to persistent forms of social exclusion based on gender, race, and class.

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