Vlog: How do policymakers and practitioners use research evidence?

Photo: Selam Mebrahtu, ACPF. © All rights reserved.

 

Jan 2018
10/01/2018

At the Putting Children First Conference in Ethiopia in October 2017, the grant holders funded by the ESRC-DFID Strategic Partnership conducted interviews with policymakers and practitioners. The interviews explored the use of evidence to inform policy and decision making and the upcoming challenges and opportunities in tackling child poverty.

How can policy makers tackle child poverty with research evidence?  

Key staff from development and donor agencies, including UNICEF, Save the Children, The World Bank and BRAC, shared their insights into tackling child poverty with research evidence and reflected on the questions: 

 

 

 

 

 

  • What are the challenges and evidence gaps in tackling child poverty?
  • What are the opportunities for engaging around children and youth?

 

How do policymakers and practitioners use evidence to inform their work?

Key staff from development and donor agencies, including the World Bank, UNICEF, UK Department for International Development and United Nations Economic Commission for Africa explored the value of evidence-informed practice for policymakers and practitioners.

 

Researchers who conducted the interviews were funded by the ESRC-DFID Joint Fund for Poverty Alleviation and the Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Programme. The interviews took place during the Putting Children First Conference in Ethiopia on the 23-25 October 2017. Thanks to all those who participated from:

The Impact Initiative blog posts are either from individual researchers or from major research programmes. Some of the blog posts are original source and are written by researchers and experts connected to the two research programmes jointly funded by ESRC and DFID: the Joint Fund for Poverty Alleviation Research and the Raising Learning Outcomes in Education Systems Research Programme. Other blog posts are imported from related websites and programmes. 

The views expressed in these blogs reflect the opinions of each individual and may not represent the Institute of Development Studies, the University of Cambridge, ESRC or DFID.

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